Poster Sessions

Example Poster Sessions

If you're working on your first poster, you might want to see what a finished physical poster looks like. We include three Web sites that show images of completed posters. If you are ready to consider how much information to include, we offer two examples of texts for posters. Finally, if you are interested in comparing physical and virtual posters, we offer links to virtual posters.

The following examples show images of physical posters from MB300: General Microbiology at Colorado State University:

Example Two

Comment

This poster has a very nice model showing both the whole organism and the organism's internal structures. The model is well labeled and visually pleasing. We particularly liked the fact that the organism was shown both in its individual and multi-cellular forms. The poster also has a nice legend to the left to help the reader identify components. Poorly labeled models are very hard for others less familiar with the organism to identify. There are also nice micrographs of the organism, and of a person with the disease. Notice the presence of photos on the right side of the poster of the many animals that can serve as hosts for this disease. All portions of the poster are nicely presented, look professional and the author of each section is easily identified.

Example Three

Comment

This poster also has a very nice well labeled model. Although there are many nice photos of the disease on this poster, a micrograph of the organism does not appear to be presented; a labeled micrograph of the causative microorganism is a must. All portions of the poster are nicely presented, look professional and the author of each section is easily identified. Notice the labels on each photograph referencing from where the photos were taken; this is essential. Also notice that each of the maps also references from where they came, and contains a legend that helps a viewer to read and understand the map. One problem is that no chart explains the demographics of this disease. If no chart could be found, the author using data obtained from their research should have created a demographic chart. Remember if you create a chart or map you must reference where the information was obtained to create your charts or maps.

Example Four

Comment

This is an unusually creative poster. Remember you should make people want to read your poster, this poster does that very well. However, as well as being creative your poster should be informative, accurate and adequately referenced. This poster has a very nice well labeled model, and many interesting photographs each referencing from where the photos were taken. Also notice that each of the maps also references from where they came, and contains a legend that helps a viewer read and understand the map. Example Five

Comment

This is a very professionally presented poster. This poster looks great, and that is important, but remember, looking good does not substitute for content, accuracy and using proper scientific referencing, you need all of these things. Notice that this poster has a chart showing the demographics of the disease, as well as a map showing the parts of the world where this disease can be found. Another thing this poster did particularly well is to present material in a short bullet format, which is much easier for the reader.

Example Six

Comment

This poster has all of the good qualities of the other posters. Notice they had to make their own map because they could not find one; however, if you make a map you should reference where the information used to create your maps were obtained. Also note the photo of a potential vector of the disease. Photos of all hosts, vectors, and reservoirs must be included on your poster.

 

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