Statistics: An Introduction

Analyzing Differences Between Groups

Statistical tests can be used to analyze differences in the scores of two or more groups. The following statistical tests are commonly used to analyze differences between groups:

T-Test

A t-test is used to determine if the scores of two groups differ on a single variable. A t-test is designed to test for the differences in mean scores. For instance, you could use a t-test to determine whether writing ability differs among students in two classrooms.

Note: A t-test is appropriate only when looking at paired data. It is useful in analyzing scores of two groups of participants on a particular variable or in analyzing scores of a single group of participants on two variables.

Matched Pairs T-Test

This type of t-test could be used to determine if the scores of the same participants in a study differ under different conditions. For instance, this sort of t-test could be used to determine if people write better essays after taking a writing class than they did before taking the writing class.

Note: A t-test is appropriate only when looking at paired data. It is useful in analyzing scores of two groups of participants on a particular variable or in analyzing scores of a single group of participants on two variables.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)

The ANOVA (analysis of variance) is a statistical test which makes a single, overall decision as to whether a significant difference is present among three or more sample means (Levin 484). An ANOVA is similar to a t-test. However, the ANOVA can also test multiple groups to see if they differ on one or more variables. The ANOVA can be used to test between-groups and within-groups differences. There are two types of ANOVAs:

One-Way ANOVA: This tests a group or groups to determine if there are differences on a single set of scores. For instance, a one-way ANOVA could determine whether freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors differed in their reading ability.

Multiple ANOVA (MANOVA): This tests a group or groups to determine if there are differences on two or more variables. For instance, a MANOVA could determine whether freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors differed in reading ability and whether those differences were reflected by gender. In this case, a researcher could determine (1) whether reading ability differed across class levels, (2) whether reading ability differed across gender, and (3) whether there was an interaction between class level and gender.

« Previous
Continue »
Introduction